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, steve forbes. his new book is coming out in august and 2012, and it is called "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom-fest in las vegas. mr. steve forbes, why is it that free markets are more government enabled. what is an example of that. >> guest: obviously, functions of government have been big government. but the terms of big government not being moral is the opposite of what it does. it ends up creating the environment where we have less ability to get ahead, it creates dependency, it plays crony capitalism, which hurts career entrepreneurship and opportunity. all the government and what it says it does, helps the poor, make sure that markets on the right direction, they actually do the opposite. they are short-term oriented to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way a business should. they have their own agenda in terms of those special interest groups and the like. the bigger they get from them were hardly due to the economy and the less chance that they have to improve your
and live. [applause] moderator: same question to you. would you do to promote job growth in iowa? steve: i look back to when i first served in the iowa senate and the unemployment rate was at just over 2%. i know what that looks like. i have gone to work, like a lot of other people, especially in northern and western iowa and advocated what was done during the crisis years of the 80's which is that we need value added agriculture. all new wealth comes from the land. i was att's from field in mind. what you understand about the global economy to menasha economy, you can really understand the economy. we have done very well. one of the very people supporting renewal energies which added more dollars per acre. today the value of products, $24 billion. and i was elected to congress was 12 billion. ag was 60 billion then, now over 200. we created a tremendous amount of wealth that has been built within the value added ag component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 second
to >> author steve forbes is trying to send booktv on c-span 2. >> up next -- >> on your screen now is the cover of a new book coming out august 2012, "seven principles of good government: liberty, people and politics." it's written by former new mexico governor, gary johnson. and he is also the libertarian party nominee for president in 2012. governor john said, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life. this is just kind of coming out of the closet. i don't think i am unlike most americans. i think there's a lot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarians as opposed to voting libertarian. so the picture and trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it does somewhere, you can always return to tyranny and i'm going to argue that so so we have right now. >> what are the seven principles of good government you read about? >> one as being reality-based. just find out what his wife, base your decision ina
c-span2. .. >> that's followed by a house debate featuring iowa gop congressman steve king and democrat christy vilsack. and later a forum on greater cooperation in combating the before of counterfeit prescription drugs. >> host: and joining us this week on "the communicators" is dade cohen, come cam's -- comcast's executive vice president. the last time you were on this program was april 2009 -- >> guest: sounds like an eternity. [laughter] >> host: just a few months before comcast bought a lot of nbc. do you feel fully integrated? >> guest: i don't know that we're fully integrated, but i think we feel very comfortable with the asset and with the level of integration between the two companies. they're, obviously, very different businesses, very different companies, and steve burke had a great vision going in that he wanted to bring the best parts of the comcast culture and the comcast management culture but respect the differences between the companies and the unique, you know, some of the unique approaches and cultures of nbc universal as being an entertainment and a cont
steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states that typically don't work all that well and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions and steve if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much gem for opening this morning and let me add my welcome. we are delighted to see you while here this morning. it's going to be of very a very very interesting conversation about syria after assad and the challenges of managing a post-assad transition. as jim mentioned, this event this morning is in many ways the culmination of a proje
areas. >> thank you. >> at evening, steve. >> and steve hammock in the chair of constitution project. and you have two ideas in here which i want to talk about because they both appear to me to be unconstitutional. last night the first is that you say we should allow campaign constitutions only from a candidate whose constituents, nobody else. >> i didn't quite say that, but go ahead. >> actually give me a copy of this chat there. and then you say we would be well served by a broad mandate and that for purposes of campaign contributions, the term persons refers only to actual individual living human beings, no corporate money, no union money, no money from political action committees, no money from political parties. political campaigns should be paid for by people and only people. how do you overcome the constitutional infirmities in both of those ideas? >> we do have to say that he's the chairman of the board of the constitution project commission is the president and i'm on the board. but steve, i had an exchange today with trevor potter, former head of the federal election commit
the two companies. they're, obviously, very different businesses, very different companies, and steve burke had a great vision going in that he wanted to bring the best parts of the comcast culture and the comcast management culture but respect the differences between the companies and the unique, um, you know, some of the unique approaches and cultures of nbc universal as being an entertainment and a content and a news and information company as opposed to a distribute company. and i think, i think steve's been able to execute that balance, um, almost perfectly. in many bringing the parts of the company together that need to be brought together but in respecting the differences between the companies and allowing the two companies sometimes to function in accordance with their historic practice and culture. >> host: you own, what, 51% of nbcu? >> guest: we own 51% now with a pathway, obviously, to ultimately owning all of it, and we are the manager of the enterprise. >> host: do you see moving forward owning it all? >> guest: well, what we've said is that we, you know, we have the opt
is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typical don't work all that well. and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions. and steve, if i can turn this over to you. >> thank you very much. thank you very much for opening us this morning. and let me add my welcome to jim's we're delighted to see you here this morning. it's going to be a very, very interesting conversation about syria after assad and the challenges of managing a post assad transition. as jim mentioned, this event this morning is in many ways the cull min nation of a project that has been
to identify with the rover is fundamental to mir's design, as steve explains. he said the whole idea behind mir is that these tools work together. look at the discovery of the silicon, the mobility system in which he means the rover's wheels trench up some soil. we notice with the pen cam wide angle camera. we hit it with the many task to check for iron. it looks interesting and we go over what they got its molecular composition. everything works together. having instruments that work together encourages the teams to work together. this was his vision which he called scientists in geneva if you you've got to sensors and each of them provide complementary bits of knowledge. you're going to use the payload to the fullest advantage if people look at it as being entirely at their disposal. if you are out there and feels, he said, doing geology which of your partner you might be argument about what this rock means or what that rock means, but you not going to be arguing about should we use the raw camera or should we use the compass? we don't have pan cam guys arguing with many task us, but rath
and poverty that i believe that stable currency. i don't believe in floating currency. i agree with steve forbes that foreign currency can is standard of value by which every imeerp europe has to guide the investment and decisions is like floating the hour so that people wouldn't have to work so many. one month you'd have the hour worth 50 minutes. the next is 70 minutes and you'd soon have an hour. the swats and insurance policy just to guide the economy. one of the things that happened over the last decade is that we've had a -- of fitness -- [inaudible] of we imper prize. and the reason for excess of phenomenon. the reason it's the wealthy and chi has migratedded to fitness. the currency is so unstable. so much money can be made in betting on the ups and downs of our currency and against foreign currencies inspect is a big danger today. a lot of people attack the chinese for manipulating the currency, but the chinese just want to keep the ciewrpt sei stable. that's all the chinese want to do. they to maintain the dplar as a starpt of value. it's us that are debauching the currency. the
.s. house debate with iowa gow congressman steve king and democrat christy vilsack. then two rivals in the pharmaceutical industry come together for a call in more cooperation in combating counterfeit prescription drugs. and live at 2 p.m. eastern, policy analysts on how congress has fared in making its proceedings more transparent to the public. later today the carnegie endowment hosts a discussion on how the next u.s. president should engage the world. panelists will discuss topics including the international order and the rise of major world players such as china. the event begins at 6:30 p.m. eastern, and you can see it live on c-span3. >>> now, a nevada senate debate between dean heller and shelley berkeley. they recently met for their first debate in what's being called one of the closest senate races in the country. the cook political report rates the contest a toss-up. this event comes courtesy of knpb-tv in nevada. >> good evening. republican u.s. senator dean heller and democratic congresswoman shelley berkeley will face off in an hourlong debate sponsored by vegas pbs, kn
obama campaign. and so, of course, i was. i was quickly connected with a guy named steve held brand who became the deputy campaign manager. he was assessing staff. i thought i was apply forking the job for national campaign manager. it's voter exact. i thought i got to put it on the table i'm perfect for the job. i said, steve never indicated back that i was being considered for national campaign directer. but i put it out there. i said, steve, here's the thing, we can take, you know, we can make it so that people can download literature, economize it, bring out to the neighborhoods or the club, we can also, you know, we tested this product back in 2004 that would make it possible that would a cell phone internet connection and computer you can turn your kitchen table in to a phone bank. you can turn your kitchen in to a staging area or min campaign headquarter. put it all on the line. i was like, i had the idea that was not probably new. i had the idea and the vendor i thought i crowld bring forward. i thought a d a great job. i heard later that david, the campaign manager said, asked
down here today. i wanted to hear walter isaacson speak upon einstein and said -- steve jobs and also lastly they talked about walter cronkite. any book that inspires anybody is great. sometimes we lose sight of the classics or they're recent classics provide tried to get mine students to read brave new world, mark twain, books that deal with racism that they could identify when they read but what is the message? and o
'm on the ballot, will be on the ballot in all 50 states. steve, right now we're on the ballot in 47 states and the district of columbia. we're litigated in the other three. so although there are other third-party candidates running this cycle, none of them are going to come close to what i just said. that said, um, where's the difference between the two? i'm going to argue that we should not bomb iran, that we should get out of afghanistan tomorrow, bring the troops home, that marriage equality is a constitutionally-guaranteed right. let's end the drug war, let's legalize marijuana now. i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. i think that's why we've fought wars. i would have never signed the patriot act. i think the homeland security's incredibly redundant. tsa should not be the federal government, it should be airports, airlines, states, knew mispalties -- municipalities. balance the federal budget now. i think we all recognize that what we're doing is not sustainable. i th
different subjects ranging from taxes by my friend steve moore of "the wall street journal" to iran by my friend michael ledeen and this one is about gender policies. >> another new book put out by adi, american enterprise institute is "women's figures." >> this book plays to the "playboy" crowd. >> this is in no strata guide to the economic progress of women in america and i want to talk about the broadside and i think some of the ideas are the same in both of these and that is the first paragraph which is compared with men and women in 21st century america live five years longer, base unemployment rate that is significantly lower, are afforded substantially larger share of high school diplomas bas and m.a. an mazen face lower rates of incarceration, algolism and drug abuse. in other words contrary to what feminists, lobbyists would have congress belief girls and women are doing very well. >> exactly, yes. it is very true that women i think earned about 58% of them may send bas, fewer in jail. their earnings when compared to men in the same job are about the same and what we need our eco
the course of two years. tom hendricks who since moved on and steve brown for tremendous work. literally, hundreds of volunteers working in work groups and task groups led by rtca with margaret jenni, and i want to thank everybody for the help over the years. just as the members are engaged in our work, we've been very pleased with the knowledge and level of engagement by acting administrator, first serving as the faa deputy administrator, mike call's become more, not less active in the work since being elevated to the role of acting administrator. with michael at the helm, his interests, and working closely with the community, i'm confident in the ability to overcome barriers to implementing next generation. you commented about succession planning, and i'm pleased with my chairmanmanship sunsetting, and i'll remain on the committee, bill ayer, chairman of the alaska air group, and bill's been formally leading the alaska air group as chairman and ceo, an experienced aveuater, is taking over the chairmanmanship on a go-forward basis passing the baton at wright patterson air force base her
they offer a tremendous amount of insight. and i also want to thank you for the steve who is here today in the our office working on a number of manufacturing issues particularly as they relate to the supply chain. for this part of it, before we get to the q & a. i would like to stand back a little bit and try to frame the specific threat of cyber in a larger context. the overall industrial base supply chain we face. i look around the room and i know i have spoke ton many of you one on one on the tough challenges we face in the supply chain. hopefully what i'm going say today won't differ from what i've told you privately. let me start at the very beginning with an attempt to define the defense industrial base supply chain. it's a term which is often used both inside and outside of government. but rarely in a way that accurately depicts trail if i on the ground. defense industrial base is come priced a diverse set of companies that provide products and services directly and indirectly to the national security agencies including the military. referses to defense industrial base, that imp
] you couldn't make it up why bother. there it is. i thank steve and in case you have the towrnlg start drinking heavily we have pbr back there on ice. it's how he celebrates. annual mrc dishonors award has winners chosen by the distinguished cross section of the vast right-wing conspiracy of department of media affairs. you may not known it existed. it does. it has been a star studded assembly and this year is no exception. this year we have for 2012, twelve judges, and it is my pleasure to introduce them to you. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> in the third and final presenter this evening is a man who needs to introduction. he's going to get one anyway just in case. he's well known in the conservative movement as intellectual heavy lifter and one of the best and cleverest humorist. he's a pass presenter for the dishonors award. he's the founding editor of "national review" online and editor at large for "nro." a visiting fellow at aei and a fox news contributor. how many jobs can one guy have. he's a national column nist. number one ""new york times" best selling author and more i
and the man the would like to be president. begin with steve in new york. you are on the air. good evening. >> caller: yes - level of the government is to protect basic rights and there is nothing more basic than clean air and water and this is what has totally been forgotten in the last year and a half, two years of the debate. the ecology is not even mentioned in this basically a simplifies modern man's complete this association and disconnection from the natural world to the point of nature distain. that is the basic difficulty. in fact, the attachment is so great that it's even skewed the perception of the reality. you are constantly hearing the word growth and overlooking one simple fact. you cannot grow indefinitely on a finite planet of the finite natural resources especially water. so, all of these candidates are neglecting this. and this is life itself and it has nothing to do with americans in the survival and i would like these candidates to address. when you consider energy more important than water. >> host: thanks from buffalo new york. what should the government be in our li
but it is rising. >> over on the right side here. >> steve space from w cbs radio. the pre-election polls i've always wondered why our listeners, viewers and readers need to know how other people plan to vote and poison the voting poll and recite them on the radio i'd like to hear the of a panelist thoughts on why do we report the polls? >> who wants to take that? >> it's the way that we gauge the narrative of the race in which way the momentum is. i was in virginia talking to people in prince william county and republicans who voted for john mccain four years ago. i don't know i'm going to do it doesn't like this is going to win it's not necessarily wanting to vote for the loser. it does affect some voters. >> on the other hand, it's not so where earlier in the cycle you say they didn't have a chance i'm not the only one who likes him and maybe he can pull this out and we are curious and want to know what other -- we also want to be part of the conversation with people and know what other people are thinking and i am not sure i think that is such a bad thing and need to be put into isolati
's steve is the first voice i hear in the morning, and he is. while melissa is a very competent and informed female voice, which i hear in the late afternoon on my way home. she was in china preparing for a weeklong broadcast with npr when a massive earthquake struck in may, 2008 and major news organizations around the world rely on her extensive reporting on the destruction and relief efforts. so now, i have many henry kissinger stories. i won't spend the full 15 minutes he demanded, but i will tell you -- [laughter] a few of them. let's try this. this past valentine's day he was my gate. well, what really happened is henry and i contacted our dear friends andrea mitchell and alan greenspan. we did this says separately about spending the evening with them and then we all ended in a downtown washington hotel room full of hearts and flowers. henry iain dhaka also sit next to each other at the defense policy board meetings and we just spent a day and a half doing that and discussing the very complicated issue of iran. at one of those meetings, henry told me -- this is very persona
correspondent. i said at monday's national conversation that npr's steve is the first male voice i hear in the morning, and he is, while melissa is a very competent and informed female voice which i hear in the late afternoon on my way home. she was in china preparing for a weeklong broadcast with npr when a massive earthquake struck the region in may 2008, and major news organizations around the world relied on her extensive reporting on the destruction and relief efforts. so now i have many henry kissinger stories. i won't spend the full 15 minutes he that happenedded, but -- he demanded, but i will tell you a few of them. [laughter] let's try this. this past valentine's day he was my date. well, what really happened is that henry and i contacted our dear friends, andrea mitchell and alan greenspan. we did this separately, about spending the evening with them. and then we all ended up in a downtown washington hotel room full of hearts and flowers. henry and i also sit next to each other at defense policy board meetings, and we just spent a day and a half doing that and discussing the
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22